BSA bulletin

BSA bulletin

Welcome to the latest Beverage Standards Association (BSA) update! This month we welcome two new members to the BSA fold – GMS Espresso of High Wycombe and Coffeepreneurs. Andrew and Claire of Coffeepreneurs will be running coffee bootcamps and continuing to support our VRQ City and Guilds training.

Along with our good friends at the European Drinking Water Cooler Association, we will be holding a very low cost pop-up trade and networking event on 3rd October. One day only out of your life for almost no cost and a chance to meet up to 40 other companies from our trades, who will each get the same allocated table space or a simple pop-up banner. Networking, seminars, places to meet and chat, and all the normal facilities, all over and done with in one day, with a buffet, bar and café. Where else would you get to meet so many people from so many diffent sectors? It’s not a trade event of the type you would normally expect, but a show with a chance to meet and chat, plus much more. The BSA AGM will be held on the same day, separate from the main event area. E-mail popuptradeshow@gmail.com for more details.

This month’s rant from me comes as an international manufacturer of re-useable water treatment systems. Water and its many uses are always the main focus for me, and we are all very aware of the need for personal hydration, and also that water makes up over 95% of the more popular hot beverages, plus the fact that UK mains water can present operational and technical machine issues. We have noticed a recent increase in awareness of dispense systems and public moves to cut plastic waste, with the Sky Ocean rescue programme, for instance, giving out refillable water bottles at the test cricket. I am amazed, then, that there has been no emphasis on plastic waste from the use of water filters, given that most good beverage suppliers will have an environmental policy or commitment. Plastic filters and plastic cups that are disposed of irresponsibly or not recycled correctly will impact future generations.

Water suffers from being free at point of dispense from taps and coolers and is treated as an infinite commodity, which it obviously isn’t. To meet the perceived quality of bottled water or a hydration station, and also protect hot beverage machines, it will normally need treatment of some kind. This has a quantifiable and not inconsequential cost, and is typically an environmentally unfriendly plastic-based disposable one time use unit (unless a recycling or reuse regime is strictly followed). More consideration is needed for the environment when specifying and using water and water-related products and ancillaries for beverages or basic hydration.